What’s So Great About Christianity?

Book Reviews, Media — By on June 17, 2009 at 8:44 pm

Atheists have it far too easy.  While Christians usually know what they believe, they don’t always know why they believe it.  This leaves the market wide open for the success of provocative books like The God Delusion and The End of Faith. Books like these sell well when no one challenges them, and then sell ever better when Christians challenge them poorly.

In What’s so Great about Christianity, Dinesh D’Souza tries to answer these and other popular secular works with an accurate and objective description of Christianity, its history, its role in Western culture, and its relevance to modern readers.  His book isn’t perfect – one simply cannot do all this well in only three hundred pages – but it is nonetheless a useful tool for both Christians and secularists.

D’Souza, a former White House domestic policy analyst and author of five New York Times bestsellers, presents a detailed and easy-to-read description of the ways in which Christianity has been and will continue to be integral to the development of the West.  He aims to describe Christianity in a way that is accessible to even the most secular audience, and he largely succeeds.  His descriptions of Christian traditions and beliefs are easily accessible and mostly accurate.  He doesn’t take Christianity for granted, but tries to examine its claims objectively.  If atheists don’t feel like they’ve been treated fairly when they read this book, they can’t blame D’Souza.

D’Souza’s work is useful not only for curious atheists but also for Christians who want to brush up on their apologetics skills.  Of particularly interest are the sections in which he debunks popular historical myths that cast Christianity in a negative light.

D’Souza offers a very hopeful view of the future of Christianity, arguing that secularism is quickly waning, and that Christianity will eventually enjoy a wide-spread societal triumph. The United States, he argues, is at the forefront of modernity, and should thus be the most secular nation in the Western world.  Instead, he says, it is the most religious Western nation, and traditional churches are growing as liberal denominations shrink.  Since Europe generally mimics the US over time, even the most secular European nations will eventually follow our lead.  While not everyone will agree with the details of his optimistic analysis, he is right to assert that the Church will never die out.

The book, as I said, is not perfect.  It is only a little over three hundred pages long, so it is understandably simplistic in parts and all-to-brief in others.  This is inevitable; however, it is regrettable that the author did not take more time to explain certain points of view that differ from his own.  This is particularly true in the science sections of the book, where his own pro-evolution views dominate the discussion more than in any other place in the text.  The Church is a big place, and Christians are a varied lot.  We disagree with each other on many issues, and science is no exception.  D’Souza is entitled to his own views, but in this book there is some danger that readers will mistakenly think his views represent those of the Church at large.

While no one book (besides the Bible!) can adequately bridge the gap between Christians and atheists, D’Souza’s book is a useful starting place for productive dialogue – the sort of dialogue in which neither side has it too easy. ‘


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  • Garnett

    The reviewer says that Christians disagree about science…..

    does she mean stuff like gravity and and the Law of Motion??

    Or is she suggesting that evangelicals don’t believe science when science says the earth is 3.5+ billion years old? Just askin.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=545652320 Rachel Motte

    Garnett,

    No, of course I don’t mean gravity and the law of motion. We’d be in a lot of trouble if we disagreed over those! :)

    In this context I was specifically referring to D’Souza’s views on evolution. Not the age of the earth, just evolution. He believes in evolution, and not all Christians do. The book had a definite pro-evolution slant, despite his efforts to remain strictly objective. This was disappointing because his argument is most effective in the sections in which he “gets out of the way.” If he’d put aside his own views on evolution and just described the differing theories that are debated by Christians, he would have had a stronger book. It seems to me that he was trying to do just that – and he didn’t quite succeed.

  • Emanuel Goldstein

    Here is something we KNOW…if atheists had the power, they would do their best to elilminate believers by any means necessary.

    From Propaganda to forced institutionalization for “mental treatments”…drugs, shock therapy, etc….to outright torture and murder.

    Gulags if you want to call them that.

    That is what EVERY officially atheistic government has ever done.

  • Mr. Incredible

    Emanuel Goldstein says:
    July 4, 2009 at 3:45 am
    Here is something we KNOW…if atheists had the power, they would do their best to elilminate believers by any means necessary.

    From Propaganda to forced institutionalization for “mental treatments”…drugs, shock therapy, etc….to outright torture and murder.

    Gulags if you want to call them that.

    That is what EVERY officially atheistic government has ever done.
    ———————————————-
    This “religious cleansing” has already begun in Canada.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=570738201 Timothy Motte

    Emmanuel,

    Wow! While horrific things have certainly happened – and do happen – under atheistic rulers, it’s important not to attribute these sins to all individual atheists. Many Western atheists in particular are sort of “Christ-less Christians”. They have been immersed in the residual Judeo-Christian culture of the West for so long that they often resemble those with whom they disagree more than they realize – that’s why a book like D’Souza’s will make sense to many of them.