Egypt’s Hosni Mubarak is gone: Long Live the Muslim Brotherhood?

Culture, Foreign Affairs, Global War on Terrorism, Human Rights, Other Religions, Politics, Religion, Religious Liberty, Social Justice — By on February 11, 2011 at 6:11 pm

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak stepped down this morning, and there’s no way to know what will happen next. While one should, on principle, welcome the departure of a tyrant, the fact is the Egyptian people might very well become less free now that Mubarak is gone.

That’s because—as anyone who has paid attention already knows—it’s likely that Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt’s best organized political force, will now take the reins. The Muslim Brotherhood ‘s supreme goal is the worldwide institution of Sharia law, and to say that they are dedicated to this goal is to insult them by understating their devotion.

Sharia is fundamentally anti-democratic. The Brotherhood has a history of manipulating democracy inorder to bring about its ultimate downfall, so don’t let the specter of free elections convince you of the group’s virtues. The Brotherhood might take leadership in Egypt violently, or they might do so democratically; either way, the danger to Egyptian freedom is very real.

And so is the danger to you. Because, despite what National Intelligence Director James Clapper would have you believe, the Muslim Brotherhood is no friend of the United States: it is one of the world’s most deadly radical terrorist groups. Consider, just for starters, their self-proclaimed motto:

Allah is our objective. The Prophet is our leader. Qur’an is our law. Jihad is our way. Dying in the way of Allah is our highest hope.

The word jihad here does not refer to an internal struggle for holiness, and dying in the way of Allah has nothing to do with dying to self—at least, not for the Muslim Brotherhood. It surely does mean something like that to the millions of moderate Muslims who do not wish to see you dead, but there’s a reason those moderates are not part of the Brotherhood.

James Clapper told House Intelligence Committee members Thursday that the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood is “a very heterogeneous group, largely secular, which has eschewed violence and has decried al-Qaeda as a perversion of Islam.” The claim is so baldly false as to be nearly humorous, as is Clapper’s insistence that the Muslim Brotherhood has “no overarching agenda, particularly in pursuit of violence, at least internationally.” As John Podhoretz points out,

This is one of the most reckless and irresponsible statements ever made publicly by an American official at a critical and delicate moment. If one of the key figures in the making of the administration’s foreign policy is already making excuses for the Muslim Brotherhood, the president needs to signal immediately that the United States does not view this evil and destructive force with rose-colored glasses. Hard to say how Obama can do that in a way that will be meaningful and still allow Clapper to remain in his office.

Clapper’s office has since offered a clarification, stating that Clapper is aware the Brotherhood is not a secular organization, but not before U.S. academics had a chance to defend his claims—proving that, even in the United States, Brotherhood ideology has already taken root.

Who knows—perhaps Egypt will come out alright. Perhaps the Muslim Brotherhood will not take leadership. I pray so. But realize, as you cheer the fall of a tyrant, that your Egyptian friends are not the only ones in danger here.

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  • Mangrovejumper

    Wait a minute. The muslim brotherhood does not represent the average Egyptian. The Egyptian army is the one in control of the country, if you haven’t noticed. When they go to the polls to vote, the supporters of the muslim brotherhood will be the minority. Egyptians are smart enough not to vote their country towards extremism.

  • http://www.facebook.com/RachelMotte Rachel Motte

    Mangrovejumper,
    True, the Brotherhood does not make up the majority of Egypt’s population. But it does make up Egypt’s most viable political opposition.

    In 2005, when elections were relatively free, Brotherhood candidates won an unprecedented number of parliamentary seats, and the NDP nearly lost the two-thirds majority it needs to ratify constitutional amendments. The elections last fall would almost surely have seen a similar outcome had the ruling regime not interfered.

    Maybe you’re right–perhaps military control will change everything. But it seems unlikely that the Brotherhood would lose the popularity it had as recently as 2005.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/hijabfaisal Hijab Al Faisal

    well, if we see, the succes kiss the feet of those people they are unite, As islam And Quran gives us the ideas of unity and brotherhood, it dosent depend where you live, you are in egypt or you are in USA.. but you all are one unit…