How Does It Feel to Be the Next C. S. Lewis?

C. S. Lewis is dead and we need a new one, someone who can articulate a smart mere Christianity, not just a vague pan-Christianity. We need someone with imagination and intelligence, uniting the visible with the invisible, helping people accept the unseeable God behind the tangible world and like what they have received. Surely, someone must rise to the challenge. Wherever that person is, whatever he or she is doing, I bet I know what it feels like to be the next C. S. Lewis. Continue reading How Does It Feel to Be the Next C. S. Lewis?

On Non-denominationalism and Tradition

Last week I wrote a post about doctrines that people feel to be wrong, and I included non-denominational churches as an example of something that I did not feel right about. A reader indicated that I took a very broad swipe at non-denominationalism and that my language was unduly harsh. I agree with that reader’s assessment. I wish to apologize for the unfairly general attack that I made on non-denominational Christianity and more carefully give my views on non-denominationalism and its relationship to theological tradition. Continue reading On Non-denominationalism and Tradition

Ruminations on the Incarnation

What does it mean for man to be made in the image of God and then to have God become man? What does it mean for God to hold mankind together–and, indeed, all of creation–and then to enter into humanity as a man himself? How does it change our lives that God lived a life like ours and now lives on with a body like ours? Continue reading Ruminations on the Incarnation

Peter’s Action: At Least He Stepped Out

When Jesus walked on water, we know that the water was turbulent. The boat was in danger, and the waves were crashing around the boat. In this storm, Jesus asks Peter to step out onto the waves. Peter, upon stepping out, begins to doubt; he begins to sink and cries out to Jesus for help.  Jesus immediately grabs his arm, saving him.  After commenting on Peter’s lack of faith, Jesus enters the boat and calms the sea.

When Doubts Arise: Vulnerability, Transparency, and Correction

A commenter on one of Rachel Held Evan’s posts about her love for the Bible,  bemoaning the (apparent) legalism of a recent review of Ms. Evan’s new book, says, “it breaks my heart that the BiblioGod of ‘innerancy’ will not permit such transparent vulnerability as Rachel’s.” Going to the review, the author does not attack Ms. Evans personally: On the contrary, she remarks how she enjoyed her brief personal correspondence with Ms. Evans. What the author does is attempt to critique not only the book itself, but where the book and its message comes from;  the author then explains why she believes it is not only wrong, but harmful.  So the question is this: Does disagreement, even forceful disagreement, necessarily mean exploiting vulnerability? Continue reading When Doubts Arise: Vulnerability, Transparency, and Correction

P.O.D., “I Am,” and Living in Culture

One of the most successful bands who managed to maintain popularity within Christian circles, P.O.D., released an album this last July, entitled Murdered Love. I reviewed the album with my good friend Nick, which you can listen to here. We talked a lot of about the album, and ended up spending a decent amount of time on one particular controversial track, but we were overall pretty much in agreement: the album works for what it is, and in some ways is a return to form for the band. It may not be up to the caliber of Satellite, but it comes closer than anything else they’ve released. I’ve already alluded to it, but there is one track that will have people up in arms (and, in fact, has already done so): the track is called “I Am,” and might be the most explicitly Christian track they’ve ever released.

And it uses the word “f*ck.” Continue reading P.O.D., “I Am,” and Living in Culture


When I made my last laptop upgrade (about a year ago), I switched to a different chat program. I’d been using one that functioned very well for my little netbook, but with more screen real estate, I decided to return to a program I had abandoned years ago, right around the time that my friends started using Facebook chat. It took me a day or two to notice, but something seemed wrong with the new program. And then it hit me.

There was no spell-check. Continue reading Spellcheque

Propaganda Doesn’t Have an Answer, and Neither Do I

Last week, Humble Beast artist Propaganda released his latest album, Excellent. You can snag it here for free, or you can support Propaganda and the label by purchasing it on iTunes, a physical copy from their website, or at a show. The album lives up to its title, and is definitely worth a listen. Most people who’ve heard of Propaganda prior to this release know him from his now-famous G.O.S.P.E.L. video. He’s a great poet and an energetic performer who considers his words carefully; this is not only something I appreciate deeply, but that I’m quick to point people towards when I get the chance. Continue reading Propaganda Doesn’t Have an Answer, and Neither Do I

Album Review: Mumford and Sons’ Babel

With a lightly fuming tall regular with room for cream, I’ve confidently settled myself at what I call “Christian-Hipster Starbucks” just outside Nashville. Since Thursday, I’ve listened through Mumford and Sons’ Babel about 7 times. Between growing familiarity with the songs and my perch in Music City’s posh, skinny-jeaned evangelical hangout, I feel ready to bust out a review of the second album of a band I started following (you guessed it) before they were cool. Continue reading Album Review: Mumford and Sons’ Babel