Archive for the ‘Book Reviews’ Category

Tossed Salad, Not Melting Pot: Review of American Nations by Colin Woodard, Part 2

This is my second post to review American Nations by Colin Woodard. In this post, I want to look at some implications for the book’s ideas in understanding American Christianity. Woodard brought together a number of things that I already thought about American Christianity, but his book laid...
January 10th, 2013 | Book Reviews | Read More

Tossed Salad, Not Melting Pot: Review of American Nations by Colin Woodard, Part 1

America is undeniably one country. You don’t need a passport to go from Maine to California and then to Hawaii. You can even go to Alaska from Hawaii, still without needing a passport. The federal government of the United States of America controls all of it. The country, of course, was not always...
January 9th, 2013 | Book Reviews | Read More

Exploring The Hobbit

When most people think of J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit, they think something like “classic children’s story” or “charming fantasy tale.”  They are not likely to think “serious work of literature”, and in that respect they would find they are in good company...
December 10th, 2012 | Book Reviews, Media | Read More

Review of “Buyer Beware,” by Janet Parshall

Buyer Beware: Finding Truth in the Marketplace of Ideas was not the book I thought it was going to be. I don’t know what, exactly, I thought it was going to be: I just know that I had not expected the Introduction as well as the first several pages of the book proper to be dedicated to John Bunyan...
November 8th, 2012 | Book Reviews | Read More

Pagan “Northernness”

C.S. Lewis once spoke on the allure of pagan “northernness” and how it ultimately lead to his conversion to Christianity.  He was “engulfed” by “a vision of huge, clear spaces hanging above the Atlantic in the endless twilight of Northnern summer; remoteness, severity.” ...
September 21st, 2012 | Book Reviews, Culture, Evangelicals, History, Religion | Read More

On the Merits of Naming Your Main Character After a Day of the Week

The Man Who was Thursday, by G. K. Chesterton, is one of the greatest books many people will never read. After posting my thoughts on Job, I revisited Thursday. I often do this: I have it on my computer, on my kindle, and a physical copy (although that never gets used anymore). I’ve read it more...
September 7th, 2012 | Book Reviews, Featured | Read More

The Luke 10 Manual by Steve and Marylin Hill: Additional Thoughts

This is part two of my engagement with The Luke 10 Manual by Steve and Marylin Hill. In this post, I will summarize the conclusions that I presently hold after thinking more about the book. The danger of reading any single book is that you will mistake it for the final word in a conversation composed...
June 25th, 2012 | Book Reviews, Church, Featured, Media, Religion | Read More

The Luke 10 Manual by Steve and Marylin Hill: Book Review

What is a house church? A high-power Bible study to replace your friendly neighborhood Baptist church? A Chinese thing that Christian sinophiles like to copy? I’m not really into revolution and radical excitement, and professional prophet types inspire me to special sorts of loathing. When I discovered...
June 20th, 2012 | Book Reviews, Featured, Media | Read More

Earthen Vessels: Matt Anderson, Meet Bob.

A friend of mine once named his own body. He called it Bob, joking that, as it was separate from his soul, it deserved a name of its own. If he didn’t want to do something, he could ‘tell Bob to do it’ for him. This may have helped him clean his apartment more regularly, and it surely gave his...
October 27th, 2011 | Book Reviews, Featured, Media, Protestant, Religion | Read More

All For One, Not One For All: Thoughts on Stieg Larsson’s Millennium Trilogy

“It is expedient for you that one man die for the people, and that the whole nation not perish.” This age-old attitude is at the heart of the drama in Stieg Larsson’s Millennium Trilogy, which begins with the international best-seller, The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. A confession:...
October 11th, 2011 | Art & Literature, Book Reviews, Culture, Ethics, Human Rights, Media, Moral Philosophy, Social Justice | Read More