Here’s your Tax: where’s my voice?

In honor of the annual day for rendering unto Caesar, it is appropriate to ask why we pay taxes.

Ostensibly, taxes are the quid pro quo for the services we expect from the government.  We pay taxes, they give us roads.  We pay taxes, they provide us with a national defense.  We pay taxes, they form a myriad of government agencies to employ hundreds of thousands of employees who cannot be fired regardless of they level of competence…

The honest truth is, if we do pay taxes, likely very little of our money goes towards aspects of the government we appreciate.  Be it the military or public education or the NEA, etc., its a good bet that we would spend our money differently, even if we still had to give it to the government, if we were entrusted with that responsibility. 

Which makes this the next question; Lang asked what we think of paying taxes.  I ask, what should we do with taxes?  Fund health care for illegal aliens?  Provide a bail-out for failed businesses?  Sponsor wars in Asia Minor to get more access to oil?  The possibilities are endless…what are your thoughts? ‘

Tea and let them eat cake

Happy Tax Day, all!

Whether you’ve chosen to observe the day by dutifully filing your taxes, sending in an actual paper check to the government through the US Postal Service (how delightful antiquated of you!), or held a tea party to protest government infringement of your liberty, we wish you a wonderful day!

And though we know you really want to watch us go back and forth on whether or not President Obama handled the Somali pirate incident well, or if Senator McCain really did diss Governor Palin on Leno, today we want to hear from you.

Taxes: good?  bad?  necessary?

Whether you want to rant and rail, discuss your utopian ideal, or speculate on President Obama’s promised overhaul of our “monstrous” tax code, start speculating in our comments section!

Please!  The long absence of posts is mostly due to the fact that (1) we’re both full time teachers and it’s AP test season right now and (2) Lang’s master’s thesis is due on 1 May and she’s been shackled to her Word files for weeks.  Give us a distraction! ‘

All Politics Are Local

I cannot begin to express my personal relief at this news…and though the LA Times is trying to portray the Republicans in California’s Legislature as the road blocks to real solutions, they are (against all odds) heroes in my book.

In what will eventually end up as a broader discussion of the fantastic amount of cash being doled out by our government to nearly every one except those on whom the economic rehabilitation would seem to depend, I would like to posit this argument:

The Economy will NOT recover faster through higher taxes while the populace are also experiencing a squeeze in areas of their private debt, mortgages, etc; it will NOT find it’s feet again through the over funding of institutions that manage to address none of the problems that prodded their demise; and finally it will not, will NOT, WILL NOT develop that healthy shade of pink (or should I say green?) we’re all looking for by forcing action quickly in order to simply look as if we are acting. 

California has spent itself into the hole, and has failed to come up with any kind of meaningful solution to the problem.  This most recent attempt at a budget, rather than cutting back on the spending that got California into this place in the first place, perscribes reducing tax breaks and increasing taxes across the board.  The outlook for families and businesses in California as a result of this policy is grim; looking out at the grand plans for the national bail-out, California’s intended temporary tax increase of $1400 for each person (an ominous word that: temporary) would effectively wipe out the pitiful $400 a person tax incentive that features prominently in the nearly $800 Billion Dollar Stimulus package.  At a time when we are struggling to weather a financial storm, Taxifornia’s strategy is to add to the financial burden of every resident. 

This plan is wildly reckless and irresponsible.  The problems we are facing will not go away without making actual changes.  The Global Warming alarmists took the opportunity this Summer, when gas climbed to nearly $5/gl, to tell us that the only way to solve this problem was to radically change the way we lived and operated.  People cut back on using gas, and gas prices dropped.  Well, we are facing a deeper crisis and it is time the politicians of all sides reflect on this reality; the road to recovery will involve cutting back on the outrageous over-extension of our government, which requires in turn ridiculous taxes to support policies that are not the purview of the government in the first place. ‘