Posts Tagged ‘Art Review’

When Pop Art Gets Critical: Andy Warhol

I used to dismiss Andy Warhol as “shallow”–that is, until I dug a little deeper and discovered the underlying coherence of his work. Warhol’s two most famous pieces, the Marilyns and the Campbell’s Soup Cans, highlight the persistent theme of his body of work: the dehumanizing...
September 22nd, 2010 | Art & Literature, Media | Read More

Minimalist Contemplation

“I once taught art to adults in a night course. I had a woman who painted her back yard, and she said it was the first time she had ever really looked at it. I think everyone sees beauty. Art is a way to respond.” —Agnes Martin As a painter, I understand a number of paintings more readily than...
May 27th, 2010 | Art & Literature, Culture, Media | Read More

Paint & Portraiture: John Singer Sargent

John Singer Sargent may rightly be considered the king of portrait painting. He worked in a style that loosely filled in figures’ backgrounds, while carefully depicting their faces. Most of his portraits were commissions, made either for the person pictured or else someone who loved them. “Portrait...
May 9th, 2010 | Art & Literature, Media | Read More

Paint & Portraiture: Pierre Bonnard

So far we’ve talked a lot about narrative paintings, compositions which are based on or tell a specific story.  For the next couple of weeks, we’ll focus more on portraiture.  Today, we’ll spend the day with Pierre Bonnard’s “Portrait of Leila Claude Anet”.  Painted...
May 3rd, 2010 | Art & Literature, Media, Other | Read More

Art and Perception: Degas

Though it is popular to view art as the self-expression of the artist, a great deal of it is in fact dedicated to problems of perception: the process of recording observed forms presents the opportunity to correct perceptual errors. Most drawing instructors will assure you that the first and most foundational...
April 26th, 2010 | Art & Literature, Culture, Media | Read More

Real Heroism: Rodin’s Burghers of Calais

I pass by Rodin’s sculpture of the Burghers of Calais every morning on my way to work.  It’s a difficult sculpture for a modern viewer to access.  Who were the Burghers of Calais, anyway?  And why do these men look haggard and miserable? The story is as old as the Hundred Years’...
April 19th, 2010 | Art & Literature, Culture, Media | Read More

Twenty | 9 April 2010

Twenty is a collection of apparently disparate images that have been thoughtfully selected to complement a great work of art (displayed first in the collection below).  Today’s featured image is Le Bal au Moulin de la Galette by Renoir. Every individual image may be contemplated in conjunction with...
April 9th, 2010 | Art & Literature, Other, Twenty | Read More

Twenty | 2 April 2010

Twenty is a collection of apparently disparate images that have been thoughtfully selected to complement a great work of art (displayed first in the collection below).  In honor of Good Friday, today’s featured image is The Lamentation by Giotto. Every individual image may be contemplated in conjunction...
April 2nd, 2010 | Art & Literature, Other | Read More

Suffering with Christ: Grunewald

Today we commemorate Christ’s crucifixion. I have found myself meditating this week on an old altarpiece from a chapel in Isenheim, Germany, painted in 1512 by Matthias Grünewald. Of the thousands of extant paintings of the crucifixion, this one most powerfully depicts suffering and death as...
April 2nd, 2010 | Art & Literature, Culture, Media | Read More

Twenty | 26 March 2010

Twenty is a collection of apparently disparate images that have been thoughtfully selected to complement a great work of art (displayed first in the collection below).  This post is the first of these collections made for Evangelical Outpost.  That being the case, it seemed sensible to begin by complementing...
March 26th, 2010 | Art & Literature, Other | Read More