Tossed Salad, Not Melting Pot: Review of American Nations by Colin Woodard, Part 2

This is my second post to review American Nations by Colin Woodard. In this post, I want to look at some implications for the book’s ideas in understanding American Christianity. Woodard brought together a number of things that I already thought about American Christianity, but his book laid such extensive foundations for further deliberation that I did not want to leave just a one post wonder. Christians mix their cultural and national biases and priorities in with their belief in God. We Americans have to understand our own cultural and national history so that we can both recognize our own errors as well as discern the flavors that Christianity develops when it takes root in every nation, tribe, and tongue. Continue reading Tossed Salad, Not Melting Pot: Review of American Nations by Colin Woodard, Part 2

Tossed Salad, Not Melting Pot: Review of American Nations by Colin Woodard, Part 1

America is undeniably one country. You don’t need a passport to go from Maine to California and then to Hawaii. You can even go to Alaska from Hawaii, still without needing a passport. The federal government of the United States of America controls all of it. The country, of course, was not always as big as is now. The most important part of anything with people in it is, of course, the people, in this case the American nation. America is unquestionably one country, but is it so clearly one nation? I recently read American Nations by Colin Woodard, asserting that America is in fact eleven regionally specific cultural blocs, or nations, and I found that these blocs go a long way toward explaining a lot of the tectonic movements in American religion and politics. Continue reading Tossed Salad, Not Melting Pot: Review of American Nations by Colin Woodard, Part 1