Posts Tagged ‘G. K. Chesterton’

The Novelty of the Old

Throughout my schooling career, teachers have instructed me to say something new, to “contribute something unique to scholarly research.” This has always been frustrating because of its obvious impossibility. I cannot say anything truly new when scholars have been writing on the same subjects for...
June 26th, 2013 | Education | Read More

Theodicy of Glory

“A chance for Faramir, Captain of Gondor, to show his quality…” J.R.R. Tolkien, The Two Towers Caution: The following post contains a slight spoiler to G. K. Chesterton’s The Man who was Thursday.  Read the book and then come back to read this afterwards. I’ll wait.   Given...
March 12th, 2013 | Apologetics, Religion | Read More

On the Merits of Naming Your Main Character After a Day of the Week

The Man Who was Thursday, by G. K. Chesterton, is one of the greatest books many people will never read. After posting my thoughts on Job, I revisited Thursday. I often do this: I have it on my computer, on my kindle, and a physical copy (although that never gets used anymore). I’ve read it more...
September 7th, 2012 | Book Reviews, Featured | Read More

Making Christianity Delicious

Recently, our pastor spent a few minutes talking about Colossians 4:6, specifically the lines, “Let your speech be always gracious, seasoned with salt.” He brought in a box of waffle fries from Chick-Fil-A, telling us that he had ordered them without salt, just to see what they would taste...
August 9th, 2012 | Culture, Evangelicals, Featured, Religion, The Gospel | Read More

There is Nothing, Son, Under the Gnu: Or, Originality is Overrated

If you want to make a name for yourself, a good way to start is to attack something people believe without question. The broad-minded will hear you, the doctrinaire will attack you, and everybody else will check you out just to learn why everyone is so excited. “Blind” faith can be a sort...
June 13th, 2012 | Blogging, Culture, Featured, Media, Religion | Read More

Irish Impressions: An Old Book Dealing with Racism, Politics, and Ireland

In 1919, G. K. Chesterton published the book Irish Impressions, a book examining the conflict between England and Ireland. That same year marked the beginning of the Irish War of Independence, which ended with the Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1921 and Ireland’s rise to dominion status within the British Empire....
September 29th, 2011 | Book Reviews, Culture, Featured, History, Media, Other, Social Experiments | Read More